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Ai Weiwei, Ai Weiwei in the elevator when taken in custody by the police, Sichuan, China, August 2009, C-print, 4 3/8 x 5 7/8".

Ai Weiwei

Ai Weiwei, Ai Weiwei in the elevator when taken in custody by the police, Sichuan, China, August 2009, C-print, 4 3/8 x 5 7/8".

WARHOL COULD NEVER have predicted that we’d get to this point. I’m on Twitter, and so are you, and so is the president of the United States. Twitter has changed the configuration of culture, as have the Internet and social networking more generally, of course. It used to be that in order to have the same opportunities as the president to make yourself heard, you had to have wealth and connections. In the future it won’t be that way, although the old power structure will still exist, and its defenders will fight hard. In fact, they’re already fighting. They are unhappy about people exchanging information or expressing ideas without permission, and they feel they must do something about it. This is the situation in China now. If you acknowledge the new freedom, it becomes an issue of life and death. Meanwhile, because of Google and similar companies, much of our private information

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