reviews

Hitoshi Nomura, Tardiology, 1968–69, one of eight digital C-prints, each 31 1/2 x 47 1/4".

Hitoshi Nomura

Hitoshi Nomura, Tardiology, 1968–69, one of eight digital C-prints, each 31 1/2 x 47 1/4".

IN THE FALL OF 1968, I conceived of a sculpture called Tardiology, which would be a twenty-six-foot-tall freestanding tower made out of cardboard. I exhibited and photographed it outside the Kyoto Municipal Museum of Art in March 1969.

I had been taught that sculpture was about three-dimensional forms made from timeless materials. However, in observing the disintegration of the cardboard packaging around an early Plexiglas sculpture of mine some months before making Tardiology, I witnessed the creation of an unplanned form shaped by weathering, gravity, and time. This both troubled and intrigued me.

By photographically documenting the collapse of Tardiology over the course of four days, I began to explore what I had experienced, and it was some months before I realized the implications for my methodology as an artist. The simple act of periodically recording the demise of the

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW for only $50 a year—65% off the newsstand price—and get the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the PRINT EDITION of the September 2012 issue for $17 or the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.