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Keith Sonnier (coproduced with Liza Béar), Send/Receive Satellite Network, 1977, NASA truck. Installation view, Battery Park City, New York. Photo: Gwen Thomas.

Keith Sonnier

Keith Sonnier (coproduced with Liza Béar), Send/Receive Satellite Network, 1977, NASA truck. Installation view, Battery Park City, New York. Photo: Gwen Thomas.

THE SCULPTURAL BASE HAD TO GO. I chose to work, and move, within a fourth dimension by placing two six-foot-square mirrors face to face (Mirror Act, 1969), creating what I refer to as an “infinity channel” to work within. First the manipulation of forms. Then color, forced to bounce back and forth within the infinity channel. Color as volume within architectural space. Solid color, not applied color. A spatial volume that the viewer moves through. The point is not to reflect upon the object but to make the object the situation (the title of the book for my 1971 show at Galerie Rolf Ricke, Cologne: Object, Situation, Object).

Then the video camera comes into the work. The first videotapes were narrative spatial studies of people and objects moving around and inside the infinity channel, recorded and projected on large flat screens. My concept of video changes. Computerized images

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