Shana Moulton, Decorations of the Mind II, 2011, two video projections, wood structure, mixed media. Installation view, Galerie Gregor Staiger, Zurich.

Shana Moulton, Decorations of the Mind II, 2011, two video projections, wood structure, mixed media. Installation view, Galerie Gregor Staiger, Zurich.

Shana Moulton

Shana Moulton, Decorations of the Mind II, 2011, two video projections, wood structure, mixed media. Installation view, Galerie Gregor Staiger, Zurich.

MY ENTIRE PRACTICE is a form of consumption. I hit my stride as soon as I realized that shopping, home decorating, and all of the television and video games I’d consumed as a child could be a source of inspiration rather than something to disown. Today, my generative consumption extends to Google image searches or SkyMall browsing.

In producing videos, I try to find the right tool, the right program for the particular job at hand, rather than letting the software itself guide my process (although that has accidentally occurred—for instance, I once discovered that a bad chroma key could yield a kind of painterly gesture). I mainly use Adobe After Effects for masking, or cutting holes in video layers and moving them around. In my experience, it’s like using a sewing machine, both in the type of concentration it requires and in the resulting repetitive strain injury. I pretty much avoid using the program’s canned special effects—except for the “shatter” option, which I use constantly. A shatter can replicate an explosion, or glass breaking, or a puzzle falling apart, and it can be reversed to snap all the broken pieces into place. When applied to particular things, such as making my own body appear to repeatedly fracture and reassemble itself, this digital effect has the added advantage of conveying my general state of mind.