reviews

Tacita Dean, Edwin Parker, 2011, 16 mm, color, 26 minutes.

Tacita Dean

Tacita Dean, Edwin Parker, 2011, 16 mm, color, 26 minutes.

THE SURVIVAL OF FILM—photochemical, analog film—depends on it being understood as a medium within the industry that has historically and commercially used it the most: the cinema industry. As long as they continue to see it as part of the cycle of the production of pictures—the pictures—and therefore inevitably replaced as technology progresses and changes, then film will not survive. But if the industry (and by industry I do not mean the directors, cinematographers, and those behind the camera, but the mind-set and financial psychology of the industry as a whole) can begin to understand film as a medium—as different from digital in the production of images as photogravure is from ink-jet printing—then they will at last realize that they have two mediums with which to make pictures: two entirely different autonomous and functioning mediums whose coexistence can increase the wealth and richness of their art. But this is not understood. Instead they are hell-bent on seeing the annihilation of the one in order to achieve the complete and total accession of the other, and like any monotheistic system or dictatorship, the cinema industry believes it needs to be absolutist to succeed.