View of Takashi Murakami’s “Ego,” 2012, Al Riwaq, Doha, Qatar. Photo: Gion.

View of Takashi Murakami’s “Ego,” 2012, Al Riwaq, Doha, Qatar. Photo: Gion.

Takashi Murakami

View of Takashi Murakami’s “Ego,” 2012, Al Riwaq, Doha, Qatar. Photo: Gion.

WHILE PAINTING has been my primary medium since I was eighteen, sculpture is something that I began exploring later on, with the help of several loyal partners. I also consider running my own company, Kaikai Kiki, and its related stores and galleries to be part and parcel of my artistic practice; the advantage of this lies in the direct communication with my clients, which allows me to have an up-close, real-time perspective on the economic and cultural changes happening around the world.

Maybe it goes without saying, but the advent of the personal computer and the invention of the Internet have been the most astonishing technological developments of my lifetime. When I started my career, it was extremely difficult to communicate one’s ideas to large groups of people—I even resorted to publishing my own free newsletter. So for me, the current proliferation of social-networking outlets provides a miraculous set of tools and has been crucial in the promotion of my work.

I don’t know much about other forms of technology, but the spread of computers has truly constituted a global paradigm shift, and I imagine that in twenty years’ time another equally revolutionary breakthrough will occur in new media. My hope is that my work has the flexibility, universality, and relevance necessary to take advantage of that moment when it comes, and that I will personally be able to participate in that transformation.