sao-paulo

Gisele Camargo, Falsa Espera (False Wait) (detail), 2012, synthetic enamel and oil on wood, 2' 7 1/2" x 124'.

Gisele Camargo

Galeria Oscar Cruz

Gisele Camargo, Falsa Espera (False Wait) (detail), 2012, synthetic enamel and oil on wood, 2' 7 1/2" x 124'.

Given that Gisele Camargo’s career began in the context of 1990s Rio de Janeiro, her urban typology—for example, deadpan painterly fragments of window views or rear facades—is both characteristic of the renewed attention devoted to the city by artists of her generation, such as Ronald Duarte, Alexandre Vogler, and Romano, and strikingly at odds with the widespread presumption that the medium of painting cannot address the urgent contradictions of life in Rio. But while the practice of urban intervention eventually crystallized into yet another artistic orthodoxy, the distance that Camargo’s paintings maintain from a direct engagement with the hustle-bustle of the streets has actually helped hone her work’s persistent critical edge.

Camargo has cultivated a form of artistic autonomy, but not in the modernist sense of the word. The geometry of her architectural structures

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