chicago

Jerome Acks, Album (#1–80), 2012–, found albums, spray enamel. Installation view.

Jerome Acks

65GRAND

Jerome Acks, Album (#1–80), 2012–, found albums, spray enamel. Installation view.

The aesthetics of record collecting are a lingua franca for many contemporary young male artists exploring their social and creative identity. The adolescent vinyl fiend, it would seem, remains, however anachronistically, a fixture of the art world. So I couldn’t help but let out an exhausted sigh as I walked into 65Grand’s storefront gallery this summer and saw Jerome Acks’s installation of seventy-three altered album covers and a display of related plaster casts. Immediately, the work of New York artist Ted Riederer came to mind; schooled in the DC punk scene, Riederer has been uniting art with record culture for years, most recently with his roving Never Records, 2010–, which he describes as a “record store within an art exhibition within a retail space.” Viewing Acks’s show, I was reminded of another work by Riederer, a poem titled “In the Heart of Nowhere,” 2010, which takes

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