new-york

Jesper Just, This Nameless Spectacle, 2011, two-channel HD video projection, color, sound, 13 minutes. Installation view.

Jesper Just

James Cohan Gallery | Chelsea

Jesper Just, This Nameless Spectacle, 2011, two-channel HD video projection, color, sound, 13 minutes. Installation view.

Even before we digest the action in Jesper Just’s video installation This Nameless Spectacle, 2011, the work strikes us as visual experience: Its setup is literally encompassing in that it is projected on two long facing walls between which its viewers must stand. Other film and video artists have explored this device, for example Shirin Neshat, who, however, used smaller projections and set them apart on the short rather than the long walls of a long room, making it impossible to see both at the same time—the viewer had to turn from one to the other. Just works instead on the room’s long walls so that both projections are visible simultaneously, at least in part, almost everywhere in the space, unless we actually turn our back, on one of them. His extension of cinema’s ability to swallow us in its world may also recall, for example, Pipilotti Rist’s Pour Your Body Out (7354

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