prague

Milan Mölzer, Amphibolin Relief, 1976, Amphibolin paint on Plexiglas, 63 x 47 1/4".

Milan Mölzer

Galerie Zdeněk Sklenář

Milan Mölzer, Amphibolin Relief, 1976, Amphibolin paint on Plexiglas, 63 x 47 1/4".

The rediscovery of Milan Mölzer won’t rewrite art history—he worked between the major trends of his era rather than beyond them—but his idiosyncratic and energetic blending of a wide range of contemporary influences nevertheless deserves notice. Born in Prague in 1937, he trained there as a typesetter and frequently acted in theatrical productions. In 1968 he left Czechoslovakia and settled in Düsseldorf, where he studied painting at the Kunstakademie under Gerhard Hoehme, a member of the Informel movement. At the time, the city was host to a vibrant and rapidly evolving art scene, including both Informel painting and the art of the Group Zero (whose members Günther Uecker, Otto Piene, and Heinz Mack were bringing abstract painting into three dimensions and expanding its focus to include the effects of light and motion). Simultaneously, the Fluxus movement was emerging,

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