zug,-switzerland

Péter Nádas, In der Geisterbahn (On the Ghost Train), 1963, gelatin silver print, 9 x 7".

Péter Nádas

Kunsthaus Zug

Péter Nádas, In der Geisterbahn (On the Ghost Train), 1963, gelatin silver print, 9 x 7".

The novels of Hungarian writer and photographer Péter Nádas arouse contrary opinions. Susan Sontag rated A Book of Memories (1986) a masterpiece; Michael Hofmann said it “isn’t merely bad but rotten.” Guardian reviewer Tibor Fischer dismissed Parallel Stories (2011) as navel-gazing “historical soup” and characterized Nádas’s admirers as credulous postmodernists or guilt-ridden, over-intellectualizing Germans. Fischer’s text triggered some thoughtful proNádas responses online, locating his work in a present-day “culture war.” Hungary’s right-leaning, populist-nationalist administration apparently regards his work as elitist, cosmopolitan, and not properly Hungarian—a characterization that many might take as a recommendation in itself.

Organized by Nádas himself and Matthias Haldemann, director of Kunsthaus Zug, the exhibition “Péter Nádas. In der Dunkelkammer des Schreibens.

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