stockholm

Spencer Finch, The Moment When Three Dimensions Become Two Dimensions (Apple Tree, 3 July, 2010, 9:38 p.m.), ink-jet print, 22 x 30".

Spencer Finch

Galerie Nordenhake | Stockholm

Spencer Finch, The Moment When Three Dimensions Become Two Dimensions (Apple Tree, 3 July, 2010, 9:38 p.m.), ink-jet print, 22 x 30".

Emily Dickinson sought the sacred in nature rather than in church. In one buoyant but sacrilegious poem, she “détourned” the Trinitarian blessing, “In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost,” making it: “In the name of the bee / And of the butterfly / And of the breeze, amen!” American artist Spencer Finch shares this spiritual reverence for nature, endlessly attempting to capture those ethereal moments in which nature overawes. Embracing paradox, his titles grasp at literal descriptions of ineffable natural experiences. He describes The Moment When Three Dimensions Become Two Dimensions (Apple Tree, 3 July, 2010, 9:38 p.m.) as “a photographic document of the precise moment at twilight when the eye can no longer discern depth in the landscape.” Finch’s words, like the poet’s, are only shadowy approximations of experience; the same could be said for this

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