madrid

Jordi Colomer, Prohibido Cantar/No Singing (Obra didáctica sobre la fundación de una ciudad paradisíacal) (Prohibido Cantar/No Singing [Didactic Work on the Foundation of a Paradise City]), (detail), 2012, still from the seven-channel video component of a mixed-media installation additionally comprising portable screens, speakers, wooden corridor, lights, and aluminum doors.

Jordi Colomer

Abierto x Obras, Matadero Madrid

Jordi Colomer, Prohibido Cantar/No Singing (Obra didáctica sobre la fundación de una ciudad paradisíacal) (Prohibido Cantar/No Singing [Didactic Work on the Foundation of a Paradise City]), (detail), 2012, still from the seven-channel video component of a mixed-media installation additionally comprising portable screens, speakers, wooden corridor, lights, and aluminum doors.

At the back of a dark space in what were once the cold storage rooms of the old Madrid slaughterhouse, or matadero, seven glass doors opened onto a corridor leading to a dark chamber. Here, looped on screens arranged like placards, were the episodes of Jordi Colomer’s Prohibido Cantar/No Singing (Obra didáctica sobre la fundación de una ciudad paradisíacal) (Prohibido Cantar/No Singing [Didactic Work on the Foundation of a Paradise City]), 2012, which together construct a fragmented narrative of the rise and fall of Eurofarlete, a fictional urban paradise, which can be read forward to the end or backward to the beginning, as you please.

Visions of urban space are typically based either on the idea of a social contract, on the one hand, or on theories of conflict, antagonism, informality, and ungovernable flow, on the other. The complexity at the core of the contemporary city,

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