new-york

Kiki Kogelnik, The Human Touch, ca. 1965, oil and acrylic on canvas, 30 x 24".

Kiki Kogelnik

Simone Subal Gallery

Kiki Kogelnik, The Human Touch, ca. 1965, oil and acrylic on canvas, 30 x 24".

“I’m not involved with Coca-Cola,” Kiki Kogelnik avowed in 1966, marking her distance from Pop art, or at least its consumerist strains. But making the association was sensible enough. After moving to New York in 1961 (encouraged by Sam Francis, whom she’d met in Venice), the Austrian artist befriended Claes Oldenburg and Roy Lichtenstein, and visited Warhol’s Factory; her early stateside output—in painting, drawing, prints, and sculpture—admits Benday dots and spray paint, flattened forms and jazzed-up surfaces. Kogelnik, who died in 1997, is having a belated moment. She was recently the focus of a retrospective at the Hamburger Kunstverein (another is slated for later this year at the Kunsthalle Krems in Austria), and was included in the traveling exhibition “Seductive Subversion: Women Pop Artists, 1958–1968” a few years ago. For New York audiences who missed the

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