mumbai

Anju Dodiya, Judgement Day, 2012, watercolor, charcoal, and pastel on paper, 72 x 45".

Anju Dodiya

Gallery Chemould

Anju Dodiya, Judgement Day, 2012, watercolor, charcoal, and pastel on paper, 72 x 45".

In Anju Dodiya’s recent show “Room for Erasures,” eight life-size watercolors, which she calls “studio-dramas,” commandeered the exhibition space, turning it into a kind of theater. The paintings, depicting the artist’s alter ego as a robed and coiffed samurai painter, like a figure out of the works of Utagawa Kuniyoshi, staged a serial melodrama projecting the internal conflicts inherent in artistic practice. In some, the heroine is pitted against her own worst enemy: a fractious, resistant self. In others, she succeeds in moving toward her vision, realizing a sense of fulfillment, a taste of perfection. Beasts (all works 2012) finds her splayed on the studio floor in front of a red-spattered canvas as shadowy black beasts menace her body. The scene here seems to imply that painting is a blood sport, but the desire to take part in it is elemental, not to be denied. In Orange

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