pittsburgh

View of “Cory Arcangel,” 2012. Foreground: selection from the artist’s archive, 2002–12. Background: Infinite Fill, 2004.

Cory Arcangel

Carnegie Museum of Art

View of “Cory Arcangel,” 2012. Foreground: selection from the artist’s archive, 2002–12. Background: Infinite Fill, 2004.

When New York’s Whitney Museum of American Art mounted a solo show of Cory Arcangel’s work in 2011, it aimed to address the lacunae where the history of Pop and Minimalist seriality conjugates with “new media” (aka the expanded field of communications technologies, predominantly the personal computer, used to generate objects that the institutional apparatus then makes into “art,” at least nominally). Arcangel’s work near seamlessly delivers the hit strategies of postwar art practices via such popular forms as Nintendo and YouTube, Web interventions, and the use of other informatic materials so frequently evoked as some kind of transgressive outside to an outmoded notion of high culture. Packaging, commodity, reproduction, and immiseration are all blithely referenced (à la Warhol and Judd) in Arcangel’s Volume Management, 2011, for example, which features a line of Vizio flat-screen

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