beijing

Yung Ho Chang and Atelier FCJZ, The Split House, 2002, wooden model, 27 1/2 x 31 1/2 x approx. 22".

Yung Ho Chang

Ullens Center for Contemporary Art UCCA当代艺术中心

Yung Ho Chang and Atelier FCJZ, The Split House, 2002, wooden model, 27 1/2 x 31 1/2 x approx. 22".

When Yung Ho Chang returned to his native Beijing in 1993 after more than a decade of architectural training and practice in the United States, he was confronted by a society in dramatic flux. He found urban conditions and forms of development more easily characterized by absurdity than by habitability—Chen Xitong, for example, the corrupt mayor of Beijing in the 1990s, left a permanent mark on the city by decreeing that all new buildings bear a Chinese-style crown (later dubbed the “Chinese hat”), regardless of structure or design. Chang decided that if absurdity was the new normal, his only response could be to advocate for the abnormal. Thus was born Atelier FCJZ, a pioneering architectural practice whose name stands for feichang jianzhu, variously translated as “unusual architecture” or “very architecture.”

“Yung Ho Chang + FCJZ: Material-ism,” a retrospective showcasing

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