new-york

Cyprien Gaillard, Artefacts, 2011, digital video transferred to 35 mm, color, sound, continuous loop.

Cyprien Gaillard

MoMA PS1

Cyprien Gaillard, Artefacts, 2011, digital video transferred to 35 mm, color, sound, continuous loop.

The bold beating heart of “The Crystal World,” Cyprien Gaillard’s first solo exhibition at a museum in New York, was a work that viewers could hear before they could see it. A snatch of an old David Gray song, endlessly repeating the name of an ancient place with as heavy a sorrow as anodyne pop could bear, drifted through the corridors and drew visitors into a large, darkened room. There, beyond the crackle and whir of a 35-mm film projector, Gaillard’s mesmerizing elegy for a ruined Iraq, Artefacts, 2011, was playing in a continuous loop on a screen more than nineteen feet high. The artist shot the entire piece with the video camera on his mobile phone, then transferred the footage to its lush cinematic support. The wild discrepancy between amateur-style camerawork and commercial-quality film stock is just one of the many contradictions that make Artefacts such a strange,

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