new-york

Anthony McCall, Face to Face, 2013, two projectors, two haze machines, two double-sided projection screens, dimensions variable.

Anthony McCall

Sean Kelly Gallery

Anthony McCall, Face to Face, 2013, two projectors, two haze machines, two double-sided projection screens, dimensions variable.

Appropriately enough, given the beautiful paradox of “solid light” with which he refers to them, Anthony McCall’s projections are often described as simultaneously embodying film, sculpture, and drawing. But McCall’s recent show “Face to Face,” which combined a physical intervention into the gallery space with his latest solid-light piece, suggested another medium—architecture—as equally fundamental to his practice.

The exhibition’s titular 2013 work, installed in the gallery’s main space, is the first that McCall has projected onto freestanding screens, rather than directly onto a gallery wall or floor. (The show also included a restaging of one of McCall’s early films, Circulation Figures, 1972, on view downstairs.) His placement of these screens inside the gallery was in itself a kind of architectural process, as they functioned like partition walls, loosely structuring

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