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Darren Almond, Fullmoon South Pacific, 2012, C-print face mounted on Perspex, 55 1/8 x 119 3/4". From the series “Fullmoon,” 2000–.

Darren Almond

Matthew Marks Gallery

Darren Almond, Fullmoon South Pacific, 2012, C-print face mounted on Perspex, 55 1/8 x 119 3/4". From the series “Fullmoon,” 2000–.

For nearly two decades, British artist Darren Almond has demonstrated a fascination with the particular ways in which we chart and divide up time. Some of his earliest and best-known pieces involve retro-style flip clocks, including one the size of a cargo container. He has made films and photographs about trains, which are governed by precisely calibrated timetables, as well as about mines, which operate in unchanging shifts. The sixteen large-scale landscape photographs in this exhibition seem to exist outside the choreographed nature of much of Almond’s other work. The pictures are part of his “Fullmoon” series, 2000–, and their varying exposure lengths are determined by the available moonlight. Yet they, too, are subject to a particular cycle: As Almond has noted, “every four weeks, there’s another chance to make a photograph.”

To create the images, most of which were made in

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