london

Dominick Di Meo, Limp Voyeur in a Humid Landscape, 1965, synthetic polymer on canvas, 19 5/8 x 23 5/8".

Dominick Di Meo

Thomas Dane Gallery

Dominick Di Meo, Limp Voyeur in a Humid Landscape, 1965, synthetic polymer on canvas, 19 5/8 x 23 5/8".

In his first UK exhibition, Dominick Di Meo was represented by a selection of his production from the years 1960–74, but the work was not necessarily what we would imagine from an artist in that era. Born in Niagara Falls, New York, in 1927 and raised in Chicago, enduring a difficult childhood that included a long bout with polio, Di Meo did not move to New York City until 1974, and so was not influenced by the Pop, Minimalism, and painterly abstraction that emanated from that metropolis in the 1960s. Instead, his interests were broader and rather unexpected: He was drawn to Aztec art while a student at the Art Institute of Chicago during the 1940s, for instance, and he visited the Roman catacombs during a two-year Italian sojourn from 1961 to ’63. Typically, Di Meo returned from Europe not with a sense of old-world elegance, but with an affinity for the rawness of Jean Dubuffet

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