los-angeles

Stanley Kubrick, A Clockwork Orange, 1971, 35 mm, color, sound, 136 minutes. Detail of contact sheet showing “the droogs.”

Stanley Kubrick

Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA)

Stanley Kubrick, A Clockwork Orange, 1971, 35 mm, color, sound, 136 minutes. Detail of contact sheet showing “the droogs.”

Once poised as the medium best suited to bridge high and low cultures, film is now, arguably, more divided against itself than ever; and what remains of art according to this new configuration is increasingly confined, or so it seems, to art-specific spaces. Thus, notice was taken whe the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, hot on the heels of its celebration of James Bond, unveiled a survey show of that preeminent twentiethcentury filmmaker Stanley Kubrick. Though no doubt a concerted effort on the museum’s part to appeal to Hollywood (whose support the local art establishment has long sought but never substantially secured), these successive shows have another, perhaps more compelling rationale: to nurture the nascent affinity between cinema—or at least what cinema formerly was and no longer is—and the museum’s rarefied context of preservation.

Embracing both contexts,

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