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Armando Andrade Tudela, UNSCH/Pikimachay, 2012, 16-mm film transferred to digital video, color, silent, 11 minutes 26 seconds.

Armando Andrade Tudela

Galería Elba Benitez

Armando Andrade Tudela, UNSCH/Pikimachay, 2012, 16-mm film transferred to digital video, color, silent, 11 minutes 26 seconds.

Armando Andrade Tudela’s work employs an array of strategies derived from the aesthetics of modernism to articulate social and cultural ideas associated with both his native Peru and Latin America more broadly. This mission inevitably brushes modernism against the grain, however, undermining its emphasis on the autonomy of art. He photographed and archived abstract geometric motifs printed on the trucks that drive across the interstate expressways of South America (the slide projection and artist book Camión, 2003); linked cocaine, a longstanding issue in Peru’s social and economic life, to utopian communal projects of the 1960s (Inka Snow, 2006, a mixed-media architectonic model); and later remade patterns reminiscent of Op art and Minimalism using rattan, a palm-derived material (Rattan, 2009). Many of these works address the relation between past and present, which is particularly

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