new-york

Frank Gehry, Miss Brooklyn Tower Study, 2004, basswood, paper, Gatorfoam, pushpins, 18 x 7 x 8".

Frank Gehry

Leslie Feely Fine Art

Frank Gehry, Miss Brooklyn Tower Study, 2004, basswood, paper, Gatorfoam, pushpins, 18 x 7 x 8".

The term sculptural has haunted Frank Gehry for much of his spectacularly successful career. While his supporters may use it in effusive descriptions of his building’s formal expressiveness, in the hands of his critics, it has become a potent means of implying that his designs lack the formal rigor that one should expect from architecture—another way of saying that the wild shapes that have made him famous are arbitrary, unmotivated, even willful. It is surprising, then, that his work appears most deliberate—and most grounded in deeply architectural processes and problems—in precisely the form that might at first seem most sculptural: the so-called process models that play a primary role in his approach to design.

Some thirty of these tabletop-size objects were recently on display in “Frank Gehry at Work,” at Leslie Feely Fine Art, and many of them were hardly

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