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Giosetta Fioroni, Ragazza TV (TV Girl), 1964–65, pencil and white and aluminum enamel on canvas, 44 7/8 x 57 1/2".

Giosetta Fioroni

Drawing Center

Giosetta Fioroni, Ragazza TV (TV Girl), 1964–65, pencil and white and aluminum enamel on canvas, 44 7/8 x 57 1/2".

In 1964, American Pop art arrived in Italy with a bang. Claes Oldenburg,Jasper Johns, and Jim Dine showed at the Venice Biennale, and Robert Rauschenberg won the exhibition’s Grand Prize, the first American ever to do so. That award process, accompanied by jury dissension and partisan maneuvering, set astir the art press, which saw in the laurel nothing less than a blow to European cultural hegemony administered by American imperialism. For its part, Italy’s homegrown strain of Pop was sidelined, and has remained so in the decades since, by the dominance of Arte Povera in 1960s narratives. But before Rauschenberg’s paintings graced the Giardini, a Roman cohort known as the School of the Piazza del Popolo had coalesced around a Pop aesthetic, one with only superficial affinities with its American, British, French, and German variants. Giosetta Fioroni was the lone woman in this

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