new-york

Howard Hodgkin, For Bernard Jacobson, 1977–79, lithograph on paper, two sheets, overall 41 5/8 x 59".

Howard Hodgkin

Bernard Jacobson Gallery | New York

Howard Hodgkin, For Bernard Jacobson, 1977–79, lithograph on paper, two sheets, overall 41 5/8 x 59".

The fifteen prints in Howard Hodgkin’s “Views”—as this exhibition was titled—invite comparison with the work of Matisse, an influence the artist has acknowledged. (The ten lithographs, two screenprints, and three etchings with aquatint traveled from the gallery’s London location, where the show debuted this past March.) In Lotus, 1980, and other works, Hodgkin uses an interior frame, suggestively a window frame, as Matisse did in The Open Window, 1905, and View of Notre Dame, 1914. Yet Matisse depicted readily recognizable objects, figures, and scenes; Hodgkin, by contrast, produces imagery that is significantly more abstract. He looks into himself even as he looks outward. The world that Hodgkin pictures through windows becomes his inner world—a sort of inscape (to use poet Gerard Manley Hopkins’s word) within the landscape.

These views are always rather moody.

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