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Julião Sarmento, First Easy Piece, 2013, 3-D printed sculpture, ABS plastic, wood, chipboard, water-based enamel on glass, ink-jet prints on aluminum, frames, water-based enamel and acrylic on paper, dimensions variable.

Julião Sarmento

Cristina Guerra Contemporary Art

Julião Sarmento, First Easy Piece, 2013, 3-D printed sculpture, ABS plastic, wood, chipboard, water-based enamel on glass, ink-jet prints on aluminum, frames, water-based enamel and acrylic on paper, dimensions variable.

The first thing one saw in Julião Sarmento’s recent solo exhibition was Two Frames (all works cited, 2013), a diptych composed of a black-and-white photograph of Duchamp’s Why Not Sneeze Rose Sélavy?, 1921, and a simple schematic watercolor of Degas’s Little Dancer Aged Fourteen, ca. 1881. Together, these images convey themes that have long been of great importance to Sarmento: the history of art in general and of modernism in particular, and the representation of the female body.

Inside the first room stood, among other works, First Easy Piece, a sculpture of a young woman mimicking the position of Degas’s Little Dancer placed in front of a gray wall on which seven framed pieces were hung. When Degas presented this work at the Sixth Impressionist Exhibition in Paris in 1881, it was met with scandal, as the public considered it too realistic; the sculpture was dressed in real

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