milan

Loredana Di Lillo, Tyrant, 2013, six framed C-prints on aluminum, each 35 1/4 x 28".

Loredana Di Lillo

Cardi Gallery | Milan

Loredana Di Lillo, Tyrant, 2013, six framed C-prints on aluminum, each 35 1/4 x 28".

A black shape, beached like a stranded whale, was the starting point of this exhibition. Two long, defenseless Mickey Mouse arms emerged from the large, boxy form that constituted the body’s central element. According to a text by Loredana Di Lillo, this piece is meant to recall the famous pose of Jean-Paul Marat in Jacques-Louis David’s painting The Death of Marat, 1793. Half-geometric and half-anthropomorphic, the black shape seems to emerge like a nightmare from childhood dreams—a puppet, a horrible creature, a character from a grotesque video game. It is inflatable and thus a mass that can expand or deflate, like the imagination or anxiety. It is a presence that is not decidedly a human figure, but one that reveals a certain fragility in its limbs, hanging loose on the floor, hands wide open. Perhaps it is a victim, not a monster. Its title, MPDM (Mommy Puffy Daddy Monster)

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