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View of “Alan Charlton,” 2013. From left: Vertical Triangle Painting, 2013; Vertical Triangle Painting, 2013.

Alan Charlton

Holger Priess Galerie

View of “Alan Charlton,” 2013. From left: Vertical Triangle Painting, 2013; Vertical Triangle Painting, 2013.

Alan Charlton describes his work with characteristic understatement: “I am an artist who makes a gray painting”—a declaration that seems just as minimal as the paintings themselves. And since 1970, true to his word, this protagonist of British conceptual Minimalism has consistently hewed to monochromatic painting in gray, developing his works as specific objects based on clearly proportioned constructions. Reduction, in Charlton’s work, is primarily a means for generating complex and exacting formal relations—between painting and its support medium as well as between the work, the space around it, and the beholder—and throwing them into sharp relief.

Over the years, Charlton’s works have charted a wide range of forms and formats; many are conceived as ensembles of interrelated elements. The seeming uniformity of his palette enables extremely fine distinctions, as he

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