new-york

View of “Matthew Day Jackson,” 2013. From left: Nearside (rust), 2013; Pieta, 2013; August 6, 1945, 2013.

Matthew Day Jackson

Hauser & Wirth | West 18th Street

View of “Matthew Day Jackson,” 2013. From left: Nearside (rust), 2013; Pieta, 2013; August 6, 1945, 2013.

There’s so much to admire in Matthew Day Jackson’s practice—virtuoso technique in the service of a wide-ranging imagination, richly appealing and evocative production across a range of media, and a meticulous attention to formal minutiae that’s all the more impressive given the increasing physical size of his works. Indeed, attempts to assess Jackson’s deeper conceptual and ideological tendencies often seem to dissolve into airy generalizations when faced with the imposing, persuasive things he produces.

“Something Ancient, Something New, Something Stolen, Something Blue,” the materially and intellectually capacious show the artist designed to fill the vast territory of Hauser & Wirth’s Chelsea outpost, was a case in point. It was full of engaging artifacts and compelling tactics: Jackson’s ostensible baseline concerns—systems (sociological, technological, ecological,

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