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Oscar de Las Flores, Gloriae Americanae (American Glory), 2012, pen and ink on kozo paper, 15 x 20".

Oscar de Las Flores

Mulherin + Pollard

Oscar de Las Flores, Gloriae Americanae (American Glory), 2012, pen and ink on kozo paper, 15 x 20".

In 1989, historian John McClelland described Edward Gibbon’s cool disdain for mobs. Gibbon, wrote McClelland, felt crowds should be regarded with “enlightened patrician contempt.” Oscar de Las Flores does not precisely share this scorn—on the evidence of the ink-on-paper drawings that were on view here, he views crowds with something more like enraged disgust.

Violent mobs fill de Las Flores’s drawings, as if combating horror vacui. Gloriae Americanae (American Glory), 2012, for example, is a mess of ravaged and raving figures. It, like all of de Las Flores’s drawings (most of those shown here were fifteen by twenty inches), is densely narrative, to the extent that we are forced to struggle to decipher what exactly is going on. Thankfully, de Las Flores provides us with written commentary for each work, which helps us decode its meaning. Without that writing, we wouldn’t know,

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