wroclaw-poland

LUXUS No. 5, 1985, handmade one-page magazine, tempera and marker on newsprint, 20 7/8 x 14 1/2".

LUXUS

Wrocław Contemporary Museum (MWW)

LUXUS No. 5, 1985, handmade one-page magazine, tempera and marker on newsprint, 20 7/8 x 14 1/2".

“At the heart of the apocalypse, there’s no time for a striptease,” writes acclaimed Polish writer Jerzy Pilch in his most recent book, Wiele demonów (Many Demons), published in 2013. But the artist group LUXUS, established just before the imposition of martial law in Poland in 1980, had long since proved otherwise. Choosing a name that slyly evokes both Fluxus and luxury, the group based its practice on the combination of enthusiasm for life and art with a deeply ironic and critical attitude toward the iconosphere of the 1980s. As one of the territories taken from Germany and joined to Poland after 1945, Wrocław—formerly Breslau—was particularly exposed to the power plays enacted in the militarization and political rituals visible on the streets during the period of martial law, which in a symbolic way confirmed its place in the new socialist order. Surprisingly, however,

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