wolverhampton-uk

Pauline Boty, A Big Hand, ca. 1961, gilt paint and collage on paper, 20 1/4 x 16 3/8".

Pauline Boty

Wave Wolverhampton Art Gallery

Pauline Boty, A Big Hand, ca. 1961, gilt paint and collage on paper, 20 1/4 x 16 3/8".

When British Pop artist Pauline Boty died in 1966 at the age of twenty-eight, she left behind a considerable oeuvre. Yet this remarkable production was nearly lost to art history; much of it was rediscovered only in the 1990s, languishing at her family’s farm. Already as a student at the Royal College of Art in early-’60s London, Boty was a well-known face. A kind of poster girl for the swinging art scene, she was memorably captured twisting away at a party alongside Peter Blake, Derek Boshier, and David Hockney in Ken Russell’s famous 1962 BBC film Pop Goes the Easel. Like her peers, Boty was seduced by the potent promise of such celebrity, but the playing field was uneven. Her witty pseudosexual posturing for the popular press ultimately did her career more harm than good, ensuring that she was not taken seriously as an artist. The long-overdue exhibition “Pauline Boty: Pop

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW for only $50 a year—65% off the newsstand price—and get the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the PRINT EDITION of the December 2013 issue for $17 or the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.