istanbul

Gülsün Karamustafa, Körebe (Blind Man’s Bluff), 1974, acrylic on paper, 23 x 17 3/8". From the series “Prison Paintings,” 1972–78.

Gülsün Karamustafa

SALT | Beyoğlu

Gülsün Karamustafa, Körebe (Blind Man’s Bluff), 1974, acrylic on paper, 23 x 17 3/8". From the series “Prison Paintings,” 1972–78.

At a time of political instability in Turkey following the large-scale protests over the intended demolition of Gezi Park in the center of Istanbul—protests that have come to symbolize issues from gentrification to democratic rights—Gülsün Karamustafa’s “A Promised Exhibition” (curated by Duygu Demir and Merve Elveren of the SALT Research and Programs team) is timely and pertinent. The informative presentation is the artist’s most extensive to date and would be compelling even without the backdrop of recent events. Over more than four decades, Karamustafa has explored her country’s history, politics, and social transformations through painting, sculpture, and large-scale installations that often deal with the impossible division between politics and everyday life. Consider, for instance, the series “Prison Paintings,” 1972–78, only now exhibited for the first time.

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW for only $50 a year—65% off the newsstand price—and get the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the PRINT EDITION of the January 2014 issue for $17 or the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.