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Sharon Hayes, Kate Millett, and the Women’s Liberation Cinema, Gay Power, 1971/2007/2012, 16 mm, color, sound, 33 minutes.

Sharon Hayes

Tanya Leighton

Sharon Hayes, Kate Millett, and the Women’s Liberation Cinema, Gay Power, 1971/2007/2012, 16 mm, color, sound, 33 minutes.

Let Anita Bryant be muted. Yes, I admit that deep down in my heart, the image of Bryant, singer and notorious campaigner against gay rights, taking a pie in the face (as she did in a 1977 televised interview) does trigger a certain schadenfreude. Still, there is something paradoxical about the fact that the overhead projection that showed this infamous moment, I Saved Her a Bullet, 2012, formed part of a show that was all about the modulation of the (female) voice. But of course the image of Bryant is double-coded in that it bespeaks both her attempts to silence the gay community and that community’s cry of protest.

In Sharon Hayes’s recent exhibition “Public Appearance,” nothing is one-dimensional when it comes to movements of political emancipation from the late 1960s onward. Take Gay Power, 1971/2007/2012, based on original footage from New York’s second Christopher Street

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