new-york

View of “Isa Genzken: Retrospective,” 2013–14. Foreground, from left: Dan, 1999; Andy, 1999; Wolfgang, 1998; Isa, 2000; Soziale Fassade, 2002; Soziale Fassade, 2002.

Isa Genzken

MoMA - The Museum of Modern Art

View of “Isa Genzken: Retrospective,” 2013–14. Foreground, from left: Dan, 1999; Andy, 1999; Wolfgang, 1998; Isa, 2000; Soziale Fassade, 2002; Soziale Fassade, 2002.

THE ISA GENZKEN RETROSPECTIVE currently at the Museum of Modern Art in New York reveals both the range and the ambition of this influential artist, and the Modern has given her the large galleries that she deserves; this is all the more important in the United States, where her work is still not well known.* In this light, responses to the exhibition have proved more problematic than usual: Though often positive in tone, many reviewers have positioned Genzken in relation to the men in her life, both older (Benjamin H. D. Buchloh, her onetime partner, and Gerhard Richter, her former husband) and younger (her close friends Wolfgang Tillmans and Kai Althoff), and some have dwelled on the fact that her paternal grandfather (whom Genzken barely knew) was a prominent Nazi. It is not likely that a male artist of her stature would be treated in this fashion; certainly he would not be

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