new-york

Jill Magid, The Shadows of the Eucalyptus Trees at El Bebedero, 2013, 16 mm, black-and-white, silent, 9 minutes.

Jill Magid

Art in General

Jill Magid, The Shadows of the Eucalyptus Trees at El Bebedero, 2013, 16 mm, black-and-white, silent, 9 minutes.

“I roamed the lobbies of hotels in the city looking for a man in an expensive vintage suit,” writes Jill Magid in her book Failed States (2012), “a discreet, older, subtle man who knew things, who was looking for me too.” Magid keeps searching for the right partner. Those who have followed her career over the past decade have met security-camera operators in Liverpool, UK, agents of the Dutch secret service, and an officer of the NYPD. With these (mostly male) members of government authorities, Magid has cultivated chaste but intimate relationships, and then turned the ensuing rapport into raw material for exhibitions and publications that spotlight the surveillance state.

It seemed like an anomaly, then, that “Woman with Sombrero,” a solo show curated by Anne Barlow, focused on the contested legacy of Mexican architect Luis Barragán (1902–1988). Magid initiated the project after

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