zurich

Thomas Julier, Dawn in the Basement (Light Check), 2013, wallpaper, LED spotlight, HD video projection (color, silent, 12 minutes), dimensions variable.

Thomas Julier

RaebervonStenglin

Thomas Julier, Dawn in the Basement (Light Check), 2013, wallpaper, LED spotlight, HD video projection (color, silent, 12 minutes), dimensions variable.

We increasingly look to screens for our views of our world rather than to the world itself. Light, the occasion for our sight, reaches our eyes from laptop, phone, camera—any of our interchangeable monitors. It glows as evenly as an infinity pool or refracts into rainbow effects and sunspots, each with its own emotional field and index of meaning. The Swiss artist Thomas Julier is uniquely preoccupied with this phenomenon. His photographic, moving-image, and sculptural works, concerned with both analog and digital light processing, adjust seamlessly to our present condition, like an eye adjusting to the desert sun or to a dark club’s mirror ball. Yet despite Julier’s fascination with light, and the clarity with which he pursues it, his work evinces a tangible darkness of character, of purpose.

Julier’s cool dystopian vision takes in disparate themes—surfaces and surveillance,

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