new-delhi

Atul Dodiya, Sunday Morning Marine Drive, 1995, oil, acrylic, and marble dust on canvas, 72 x 96".

Atul Dodiya

National Gallery of Modern Art | New Delhi

Atul Dodiya, Sunday Morning Marine Drive, 1995, oil, acrylic, and marble dust on canvas, 72 x 96".

Atul Dodiya’s “Experiments with Truth” was the first survey show of a living Indian artist at the National Gallery. Curated by Ranjit Hoskote, the exhibition looked back on three decades of Dodiya’s practice and showcased more than eighty works, including paintings on paper, canvas, laminate boards, and rolling shutters, and assemblages housed in glass cabinets. The show wasn’t expansive enough to be considered a retrospective, particularly because a few significant bodies of work—“Cracks in Mondrian,” 2005, and “Broken Branches,” 2003, to name two—were not represented. Still, “Experiments with Truth” was an informative summary of the vertiginous turns in Dodiya’s practice.

One of India’s most important artists, Dodiya is known for the ease with which he borrows from the canons of both Indian and Western art. Packed with references, his works bring the local and the

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