new-york

Dotty Attie, Enthusiastic Fans, 2011, twenty-five panels in oil on linen, each 6 x 6".

Dotty Attie

P.P.O.W

Dotty Attie, Enthusiastic Fans, 2011, twenty-five panels in oil on linen, each 6 x 6".

Dotty Attie first began to exhibit in the early 1970s, a period often remembered as hostile to painting as a medium of significant art. Indeed, although she began her career as a painter, from 1970 onward Attie worked not in painting but in drawing, and when she started to paint again, around 1985, she leaned on the strategies of Minimal and Conceptual art, the schools that had displaced painting in the art world’s attention. Attie worked and continues to work serially, mostly on canvases of the same size, a small six inches square, and she shows her groups of pictures in grids or rows. In doing so, she undercuts the individuality of any one painting, any sense of its expressive uniqueness or its responsiveness to its maker’s mood. Rather, each painting is phrased as a semantic unit, like the words of a sentence or the pages of a book, dependent on its context, its place in a

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