gwangju

View of Eyal Weizman, Roundabout Revolution, 2013, mixed media. From Gwangju Folly II.

“Gwangju Folly II”

Various Venues

View of Eyal Weizman, Roundabout Revolution, 2013, mixed media. From Gwangju Folly II.

What lasting, tangible benefits do large-scale recurrent exhibitions offer their host communities besides display halls and tourist dollars? Such questions lie at the heart of Gwangju Folly, which commissions permanent pavilions for public use. The project was initiated as part of the 2011 Gwangju Design Biennale, but, as of its second installment last year, has become independent while its “pavilions” seem to have radically expanded to include significant political and cultural engagement. Artistic director Nikolaus Hirsch (with curators Philipp Misselwitz and Eui Young Chun) asked eight participants not only to intervene in the city’s current fabric but to address the legacy of the 1980 Gwangju Democratization Movement, a citizen’s uprising that temporarily occupied the city until it was violently suppressed by the South Korean military dictatorship. Thus, in its work Power

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