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Stan Douglas, Luanda-Kinshasa, HD video, color, sound, 361 minutes.

Stan Douglas

David Zwirner | 519 West 19th Street

Stan Douglas, Luanda-Kinshasa, HD video, color, sound, 361 minutes.

In the spring of 1974, a coup d’état in Portugal sent the dictatorship of António de Oliveira Salazar tumbling from power. Salazar himself had died some years earlier, having suffered a brain hemorrhage in 1968, when he reportedly fell from a chair. His colleagues in the Estado Novo party were not only right-wing and repressive but were also increasingly unable to manage Portugal’s far-flung colonies. When the junta finally seized hold of the state, it simply cut those colonies loose. And so, like the dominoes of Arab autocracies in a more recent season of supposed reawakening and rebirth, countries across Lusophone Africa, such as Angola, Cape Verde, Guinea-Bissau, and Mozambique, found themselves thrust into independence and, more often than not, plunged into civil war.

As case studies in postcolonialism go, Angola was in many ways the most fascinating of the former colonies, in

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