hong-kong

Documentation of “Dropping Event” by Hi Red Center at Ikenobo Hall, Tokyo, October 10, 1964. Photo: Minoru Hirata. From “Great Crescent.”

“Great Crescent”

Para Site

Documentation of “Dropping Event” by Hi Red Center at Ikenobo Hall, Tokyo, October 10, 1964. Photo: Minoru Hirata. From “Great Crescent.”

Having been Japanese colonies until 1945, Taiwan and Korea, along with their former conqueror, were gradually absorbed into American Cold War policy in East Asia as part of an economic and political buffer zone dubbed the “Great Crescent.” This historical legacy formed the foundation for the transnational curatorial study “Great Crescent: Art and Agitation in the 1960s—Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan,” which collated archival documentation from anti-art performance scenes from the three nations.

The exhibition was described by its curators—Cosmin Costinas and Lesley Ma of Para Site and Doryun Chong of curatorial project A Future Museum for China—as a “small essay in comparative art history.” It began with Yoko Ono’s Cut Piece,filmed in New York in 1965 but originally performed at Kyoto’s Yamaichi Concert Hall in 1964. In that it was performed in both Japan and America,

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