new-york

Kazuko Miyamoto, Untitled String Construction, n.d., hand-dyed cotton, nails, 116 x 27 x 85".

Kazuko Miyamoto

INVISIBLE-EXPORTS

Kazuko Miyamoto, Untitled String Construction, n.d., hand-dyed cotton, nails, 116 x 27 x 85".

In 1969, Kazuko Miyamoto was working in her live-in studio at 117 Hester Street when the fire alarm went off. Congregating on the street below with other artists from the building, she met her neighbor Sol LeWitt, and soon after became his assistant. For several decades, she executed his wall drawings and oversaw the production of his modular cube sculptures. Today, the Japanese-American artist is best known for her signature post-Minimalist work, as well as for establishing Gallery Onetwentyeight, a Lower East Side storefront space, in 1986. Fourteen years earlier she had cofounded the feminist cooperative A.I.R. Gallery, where she had solo shows in 1975, 1977, 1979, and 1980.

Miyamoto’s recent exhibition in New York—her first solo show in the city in eleven years—examined the beginnings of her work and featured a judicious selection from the 1970s: geometric, abstract

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