new-york

View of “Sarah Crowner,” 2014. Wall: The Wave (Flame), 2014. Floor: Platform, Hot Blue Terracotta, 2014.

Sarah Crowner

Nicelle Beauchene Gallery

View of “Sarah Crowner,” 2014. Wall: The Wave (Flame), 2014. Floor: Platform, Hot Blue Terracotta, 2014.

For her first exhibition at Nicelle Beauchene, held in 2009, Sarah Crowner juxtaposed two bodies of work: a series of unglazed ceramic vessels and a group of “paintings” sewn together from remnants of discarded fabric. Both revealed a distinctive handmade quality. The former featured mottled surfaces, gently misshapen necks, and generally uneven forms, while the latter betray imperfections of alignment that open up pockets of space, holes amid the just-mismatched seams. Those paintings, with their insistent tactility and crisp, high-keyed geometric designs—they broadly referenced the fabric works of Sophie Taeuber-Arp and Blinky Palermo, among others, and were sometimes directly appropriated from specific compositions—presaged the artist’s subsequent production. So, too, did the pots set the tone for more recent developments: the ceramics lacked bottoms, and were therefore

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