los-angeles

William E. Jones, The most beautiful world is like a heap of rubble, tossed down in confusion., 2013, three ink-jet prints, each 64 x 58 3/4".

William E. Jones

David Kordansky Gallery

William E. Jones, The most beautiful world is like a heap of rubble, tossed down in confusion., 2013, three ink-jet prints, each 64 x 58 3/4".

William E. Jones’s experimental film and video work of the past two decades has consistently aimed to resurrect and reframe lost, repressed, or occluded visual histories, including those of gay subcultures going back to antiquity, military and police surveillance, and the vast photographic project of the Farm Security Administration. Jones’s practice has also consistently involved deep archival research, which increasingly takes place via the Internet. For his latest series, “Heraclitus Fragment 124, Automatically Illustrated,” 2013– , Jones expanded his purview to treat the Internet itself—or, more precisely, the operations of Google Image Search (GIS) and the digital junk it continuously churns through and spits out—as a ready-made archive. Jones tested the “epistemology of search” (as David Joselit has put it) by plugging in wildly varying translations of a well-known

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