london

Al Taylor, Untitled: (Latin Studies), 1985, acrylic on plywood and enamel on wooden broomsticks mounted on Formica, 25 x 17 1/2 x 15 1/2". From the series “Latin Studies,” 1984–85.

Al Taylor

David Zwirner | London

Al Taylor, Untitled: (Latin Studies), 1985, acrylic on plywood and enamel on wooden broomsticks mounted on Formica, 25 x 17 1/2 x 15 1/2". From the series “Latin Studies,” 1984–85.

Around the mid-1980s, Al Taylor began to extend his drawing and painting practice into three dimensions, turning chipped wooden broomstick handles and other found carpentry scraps into linear, wall-mounted (and later, freestanding) constructions. Taylor—who died in 1999 at the age of 51—carefully assembled the broomsticks into small clusters and structures that protrude out and away from the wall, like lines drawn in space, although one example in this recent show, Untitled (Pick Up) #2, 1990, sits on a series of upright aluminum rods as though floating above the floor. Taylor’s sculptural work engages in a playful back-and-forth between literalism and illusion, figuration and abstraction, never quite settling on one or the other. He also had a keen eye for the witty and the silly, and Layson a Stick (Blue Balls),1992, is a good example of the wordplay and visual gags

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