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Andreas Siekmann, In the Stomach of the Predators (detail), 2013, steel, wood, digital prints on canvas, dimensions variable.

Andreas Siekmann

Galerie Barbara Weiss

Andreas Siekmann, In the Stomach of the Predators (detail), 2013, steel, wood, digital prints on canvas, dimensions variable.

This show took its title from a line by Karl Marx––both figuratively and literally. Witness to a parliamentary debate in 1842 that resulted in a ban on gathering fallen twigs for firewood in public forests in Germany’s Rhineland, until then a common practice among the poor, Marx imagined, “In the stomach of the predators, nature has provided the battlefield of union, the crucible of closest fusion, the organ connecting the various animal species.” The rural aristocracy was reshaping feudal standards of property, and, as Marx argued, the citizenry was becoming subject to control by private interests where natural resources were at stake. Timely in its own way, Andreas Siekmann’s exhibition “In the Stomach of the Predators” aimed his signature, isotype-style pictograms and patent critical Marxist methodology at the socioeconomics of agriculture, from multinationals such as Monsanto

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