milan

Stephan Balkenhol, Frau in schwarzem Kleid (Woman in Black Dress), 2013, painted wood, 67 x 7 7/8 x 7 7/8".

Stephan Balkenhol

Monica De Cardenas | Milan

Stephan Balkenhol, Frau in schwarzem Kleid (Woman in Black Dress), 2013, painted wood, 67 x 7 7/8 x 7 7/8".

Auguste Rodin famously studied the Belvedere Torso, and one of the primary lessons he learned from it was that an inert and fragmentary muscular posture can impart a profound sense of internal tension and intense psychological activity. This realization was Rodin’s point of departure when he began working on sculptures and groups such as The Thinker, 1880–81, and The Gates of Hell, begun in 1880 and still unfinished at the artist’s death in 1917. While in the first case he wanted to convey an intellectual drama through the representation of a male nude, characterized by a still body and tormented soul, in the second, he turned his attention to an investigation of the partial figure as an autonomous formal device—something that, over the course of the twentieth century, would evolve from the imitation of nature to the development of a new sculptural language, articulated in

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