london

View of “Eva Rothschild,” 2014. Left: Honeymoon, 2014. Foreground and background: Fall, Fall, and Falling, 2014. Middle ground: Lantern, 2014.

Eva Rothschild

Stuart Shave Modern Art

View of “Eva Rothschild,” 2014. Left: Honeymoon, 2014. Foreground and background: Fall, Fall, and Falling, 2014. Middle ground: Lantern, 2014.

She’d already been profusely exhibited in British galleries and institutions for at least five years by then, but my initial encounter with Eva Rothschild’s sculpture was via “Early One Morning: British Art Now.” That 2002 Whitechapel Gallery exhibition proposed a link between some of the rising sculptors of that moment—along with Rothschild, they included Shahin Afrassiabi, Claire Barclay, Jim Lambie, and Gary Webb—and the artists associated with the new British sculpture of the 1960s: Anthony Caro (from whose wonderful 1962 piece the Whitechapel borrowed the title), Phillip King, Tim Scott, and so on. While the effort to lend pedigree to the up-and-comers and contemporary credibility to some out-of-fashion elders might have been as unconvincing as it was well-intentioned, what was clear was that there was still a widely felt need to take formal and material heterogeneity

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